Home

Welcome to Coordinates: CEEatGT's student travel blog!

       

Shinkansen: Intercity Travel in Japan

A video of Shinkansen arriving at a station: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1AVaE1Em_N6BTU0RTIT6zQMLXPc_Xtt7R/view?usp=sharing

I think I have ridden on long distance trains in Italy when I was younger, but I don’t remember much of riding on the train. I can remember the stations being smaller with less stores and all the trains were on the same floor area. The stations were more chaotic, with similar amounts of people, but everyone walks everywhere. Here in Japan the walkways...

By:
Class:
Where:






Resilience in Japan

Our group observed many differences between living conditions inside the Tokyo megaregion and in Fukushima, an area outside of the Tokyo megaregion that was damaged by the March 2011 earthquake. One of the most obvious differences between the two regions is their population densities. This results in the use of different sustainability methods to improve the living conditions of each region. In the Tokyo megaregion, the high population density means that it is difficult for power to be directly generated inside of the city. Instead, power is outsourced from other regions. For...

By:
Class:
Where:






Shinkansen: 55 Years of Sustainable Precision

Japan’s most famous form of transportation is the shinkansen or the “bullet train.” The country first opened the shinkansen for commercial use in 1964 and has since continued to improve the technology, sustainability, and ergonomics of the transportation system.

Unfortunately, I haven’t experienced much intercity travel beyond the United States. While traveling in America, I’ve only ever flown from city to city or driven in a personal car. As such, I...

By:
Class:
Where:






Japan Train Systems, led by the king, the Shinkansen

In terms of transit systems and trains in general, Japan definitely has an upper hand. Technologically, sustainably, and systematically, Japan is one of, if not the world’s leader in efficient transit/train travel. Specifically, in the case of the Shinkansen, Japan’s several bullet trains, this is a system that is truly impressive and trumps many forms of transportation around the world.

             ...

By:
Class:
Where:






From Tokyo to Fukushima

During the trip from Tokyo to Fukushima and back, there were noticeable differences between the development environments varying from urban to rural. There were, of course, no skyscrapers, and the buildings were definitely more spread out. They were, however, not as spacious as they would be back in a typical suburban neighborhood in the United States because of how dense Japan's land is. A lot of rice patties and flourishing vegetation could also be seen from the train window, and the houses outside the Tokyo megaregion take on a more traditional appearance with its curved roofs and...

By:
Class:
Where:






Sustainability Inside and Outside of a Japanese Megaregion

          Considering how our group has only been in Japan for about a week and a half, we have already traveled relatively extensively throughout the country, from Tokyo to Fukushima and now to Kyoto. Despite existing within the same nation, sustainable living conditions can be addressed differently inside and outside of a megaregion, such as in the case of Tokyo versus Fukushima. Sustainable living conditions are even handled in different manners from megaregion to megaregion, which is exemplified by Tokyo of the Greater Tokyo Area compared with Kyoto of...

By:
Class:
Where:






The simplicity of the Shinkansen

After traveling for the first time on a Shinkansen train this week, I have now experienced intercity travel in 3 parts of the world. I have traveled by train in Japan and Europe and I have taken buses or flown in the US. While traveling, I noticed a few similarities and differences in intercity travel among the three places.

First, I noticed that everyone on the train was extremely quiet. This lines up with what I experienced going from city to city on the euro rail or flying in planes across the US. It seems that on most long-distance public transportation, people tend to remain...

By:
Class:
Where:






Pages