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Blog Post 5: Initial Assessment

Initial Assessment of cycling in the Netherlands  

        The differences between cycling in the Netherlands versus the U.S. were clear immediately when we arrived in Delft. Even on the train from Amsterdam, the rural roads we passed all had bike infrastructure, whereas rural bike infrastructure in America is difficult to find. Dutch engineers and planners account for cyclists and pedestrians on every route. Cycling around Delft and to Maeslantering was a bit nerve-wracking at times, but only because I...

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Blog Post #5: Initial Assessment

Initial Assessment

After cycling around Delft and the countryside, my initial assessment is that cycling as a mode of transportation is a baseline assumption for engineers and planners here in the Netherlands. As a result, cycling facilities are a given, not just a privilege, as they seem to be in the U.S. It seems as though no matter what direction you are traveling, there will always be a cycling facility available. Sure, the major roadways may not have any provisions for cyclists, but there is likely a smaller road that runs parallel to the major roadway that...

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BP#5 The Netherlands: Initial Assessment

Hallo from the Netherlands!

This past Friday we took a 9-hour flight to Amsterdam, hopped on a couple of trains, and arrived at our first destination: Delft. Since arriving, we’ve been biking our way through the town squares, exploring popular local sites, and of course, eating stroopwafel. For this post, I’ll discuss my first couple of days abroad in Delft, and share insight into the differences between cyclist infrastructure and culture in the US versus the Netherlands.

 

Different country, different design mindset...
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Two Days Abroad: Initial Assessment

Integration versus Separation

Bikes, bikes and more bikes! There are so many bikes all over the city of Delft that become part of the city scenery. I’ve seen several mixed-use streets that vehicles, cyclists, and pedestrians share in Delft city center. One is featured below where you can see a man on a skateboard, an elderly woman cycling, and two teenagers cycling alongside each other on the roadway, with an elevated sidewalk for pedestrians.

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Blog Post #5: Initial Assessment

By Laura Kelly

3-18-19

First Day, First Thoughts

Upon arriving to the Netherlands and retrieving our bicycles, it quickly became clear how prevalent cycling is in Delft. However, on our first day of real biking, I was surprised by how difficult biking was. In Atlanta, biking is difficult because of a lack of infrastructure and awareness, and the resulting lack of safety. On the way to Maeslantkering, the sights were...

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Initial Assessment

Initial Assessment

After two days in the program, I’ve noticed that dedicated bike infrastructure is more prevalent in the Netherlands. It feels as if the entire town of Delft has a connected bike network that is widely used and people of all ages cycle. Paths are shared with both pedestrians and vehicles at times without much conflict or stress. In my experiences so far, traveling by bicycle has been pleasant, effective, and safe in Delft.

Difference in Design

The Dutch approach to cycling infrastructure is more cognizant of the safety of...

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The Dutch Magic Touch: Initial Takeaways

How’s cycling?

Well, unsurprisingly, cycling is great. First of all, the contour of the Netherlands is incredibly flat. It’s so flat, in fact, that the steepest hill we have yet to hit is right before going over a bridge. The piedmont has really cursed Atlanta in the hill department. Second, I have felt extremely safe, for a number of reasons that I’ll discuss in the following sections. Overall, throughout Holland, bikers are much more respected, and the Dutch actually put an emphasis on those who are the most vulnerable, which is refreshing. Lastly, I have had so...

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