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Welcome to Coordinates: CEEatGT's student travel blog!

       

First Impressions

My first two days in the Netherlands have been incredible and mind–opening. The difference in the cycling experience is so great that even after two days of riding, I still find myself following habits formed in the US that aren’t useful in the Netherlands. That isn’t to say that I’ve had difficulty with the Dutch system; I felt comfortable from the start and I had filled the gaps in my knowledge by the end of my first day of riding. Once I knew which signs meant I had to yield, everything straightforward. The most difficult piece of infrastructure understand is the...

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Welcome to the Netherlands blog 5

Reid Passmore 6/5/17



Welcome to the Netherlands. The past few days, we have immersed ourselves in transportation utopia. Before I get too distracted, I have to remind myself what I hope to get out of this program. My goal is simply to take the 'feel' of Dutch infrastructure and translate it into something the US could use. Atlanta, unlike the Netherlands, is pretty devoid of bodies of water, and it is a lot hillier. The summers are also much more intense. Some Dutch solutions may not work for us. But the fundamental question is how do we get people...

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Initial Experience in the Netherlands

By April Gadsby

We have been in the Netherlands for 3 days now, 2 of which we have had our bikes. Despite already knowing that biking here is commonplace, I didn't really realize just how common it is until I experienced it. Perhaps common isn't the word to describe it, but natural. Just like in America where many people don't even think of using any mode besides a car, it seems these people will automatically choose bike. Some shared roads near the center of town can feel chaotic with bikers going all directions and pedestrians and scooters in the mix as well, but they...

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Two Whole Days

By Annie Blissit, June 5, 2017

Some moments I can’t believe it’s already been over two days and others I feel like we’ve been here forever. After arriving in Amsterdam, we boarded the train to Delft in the station seamlessly connected to the airport. Upon arriving, we had some free time to check out the city before picking up our bikes. Picking out our bicycles made me feel even shorter than usual. The Dutch are statistically the tallest people in the world so the fit of the uprights is a bit different than back home. I was just glad to get one with...

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Biking the Netherlands

By Spencer Maddox 6/5/17

After a few days in the Netherlands, biking here is much easier than the United States. Biking in the Netherlands is like taking a stroll in a park in the United States. It is peaceful and calm. If someone is faster than you (a runner in a park), they simply pass you on the left when possible. Many, many, many (and this is an understatement) more people bike in Delft than in the United States. The design assists greatly in accomplishing this. 

The Dutch design prioritizes bikes. While biking to Rotterdam, we biked on a protected cycle track for...

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Pre-Trip Readings

By Annie Blissit

There is a reason that the bike share of trips is 1% in the United States and 26% in the Netherlands (Pucher 2012). In the Netherlands, the highest percent of trips by cycling are made by those younger than 17. Also notable is that the third highest percent of trips by cycling are made by those older than 65. There are many differences between the US and Netherlands- including terrain, travel distance, and density- that present challenges to bicycling in the US; however, when studying cities, where density and trip distance limit deterrents, the challenge...

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Blog 4 Readings

By Reid Passmore 6/4/17



Over the past few weeks I've been reading over Buehler's City Cycling book. Early on, it is established that there are fundamentally different schools of thought on bike infra: traffic integration and separate. With North America touting the former, the Netherlands stresses the latter.This fundamental difference has led to different infrastructure, cycling populations, cycling fatality/injury rates, and public policies.



US cycling infra, keeping in line with vehicular cycling, is pretty...

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