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Observations of Japan's Two Megaregions

Starting in Tokyo and ending in Kobe, I have noticed several differences between the two cities that belong in their respective megaregions, the Greater Tokyo Area and the Keihanshin. While the Greater Tokyo Area is comprised of Tokyo and neighboring prefectures, the three primary cities of the Keihanshin are Kyoto, Osaka, and Kobe. With Tokyo being a small island country, the two megaregions are located relatively close to each other, yet each area has managed to cultivate their own distinct culture. The cultural differences are easily distinguishable between the two, given their language...

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Cultural Differences in the World's Most Homogeneous Nation

Despite being the closest thing the world has to a perfect nation-state, Japan is not without its regional differences. Ironically, these differences are one of the biggest similarities I have found between Japan and America. Though we are, indeed, the United States, we often see large idealistic gaps between geographical regions, mainly between the north and south, and Japan surprisingly has similar tendencies even if they are expressed in different ways. In going from the greater...

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Regionalism in Japan and America

From my time traveling around Japan, I’ve been able to compare this country to America fairly comprehensibly. I’ve traveled from Tokyo to Fukushima to Kyoto to Hiroshima and now reside in Kobe. This span of travel has also showed me many similarities and differences between the regions of Japan. 

 

https://steemit.com/life/@westjapandaily/controversy-on-japanese-escalator-manners

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Regionalism in Japan's Megaregions

Over the past two weeks, we made our way from one megaregion to another as we traveled from Tokyo to Keihanshin. In both places, it is easy to tell why they are called megaregions. Looking over the skyline of both regions, all that can be seen is buildings for miles and miles. Although both regions are very highly populated and are centers of economic output, they each have their unique cultures, lifestyles, and traditions. Below is a picture of the Tokyo skyline.

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Greater Tokyo vs. Keihanshin: Comparing Japan's Megaregions

          Within the past three weeks, our class has already gotten to experience the two megaregions of Japan: Greater Tokyo, which is comprised of Tokyo and its surrounding cities, and Keihanshin, which is composed of the major cities of Kyoto, Osaka, and Kobe in addition to the smaller cities around this area. Even though people can easily traverse between Greater Tokyo and Keihanshin thanks to Japan’s exceptional railway system, the proximity of these megaregions to one another does not eliminate the existence of differences between the two. Both Greater...

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Regionalism in Japan

The first week of this program was spent in Tokyo, a part of the Kanto region, we then proceeded to the travel leg and have ended up in Kobe, a part of the Kansai region. Even though these regions are part of the same country and are relatively close to each other (at least in an American standard) there are a lot of cultural differences between them.

The first difference that I observed was the way people stood on escalators. In the Kanto region, most people stand on the left side and leave the right for people in a rush. Whereas in the Kansai region, people stand on the...

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Building Smart Cities in Japan

LED lights at Shibuya crossing

Over the course of our stay in Tokyo and exploring during the travel leg, I have experienced several information and community technologies (ICTs) that show Japan’s commitment to cultivating smart cities. These innovations not only promote sustainability, but also improve the everday lives of Japanese citizens by increasing accessibility and limiting the waste of resources. Some of these technologies exist in the United States, but...

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