Home

Welcome to Coordinates: CEEatGT's student travel blog!

       

Blog Post #4: City Cycling

The cycling attitude in the Netherlands is completely different from that in other parts of the world. While reading “City Cycling” by John Pucher and Ralph Buehler, I was amazed at the age distribution of cyclists in different countries in the world. In the United States, bike use continues to decrease as the age of the cyclist increases. Bicyclists over 65 years old use a bicycle for about 0.5% of all trips, compared to a bike usage of 0.8% for users 25-39 years old. However, in the Netherlands, citizens 65 and older use bikes for 23% of trips compared to 21% of trips for 26-...

By:
Class:
Where:






Blog Post #4: An Adventure in Reading (before the real adventure begins)

The countdown has begun until we leave for the Netherlands! We depart exactly one week from today. If I wasn’t already excited enough, reading through City Cycling has definitely hyped up all the cool things we will be experiencing on our trip. There are so many differences between transportation design and planning in the Netherlands and the United States. The differences can be summarized into who bikes, how and why they bike, and how design and policy are implemented.

WHO BIKES?

I think a better question is “who doesn’t bike in...

By:
Class:
Where:






A Different Approach

While often considered an afterthought and a niche in the United States, cycling plays an integral role in the daily lives of the Dutch. Emphasizing the necessity of providing adequate bicycle infrastructure for travel to shopping, work, school, and recreation, the Dutch have created an unparalleled system of sustainable infrastructure capable of serving the needs of their population in a safe, clean manner. In Dutch transportation planning, there is a pressing obligation to consider the needs of all people and all modes, serving the belief that everyone should be comfortable walking or...

By:
Class:
Where:






Blog Post #4 City Cycling

How is transportation design and planning different in the Netherlands?

            In the Netherlands, transportation is designed for every user to have their own path. The bicycle path, sidewalks, and roads are all separated from one another. The bicycle paths are protected and separated from motor traffic by a raised mediums or bollards. Whereas sidewalks are separated by landscape items. These separations of the users, arise from the “Sustainable Safety” program. This program wanted to ensure...

By:
Class:
Where:






Blog #4 Readings

Current status of the Netherlands vs. US in terms of cycling

The bike share of trips is only about 1 percent in the United States and about 26 percent in the Netherlands. Daily distance cycled per capita, ranging from 0.1 km in the United States and 2.5 km in the Netherlands. The higher share of trips by bicycle in Dutch cities may be partly explained by shorter trip distances than in American due to more mixed-use development, less suburban sprawl, and higher population densities in Europe. In the Netherlands, 40 percent of all trips are shorter than 2.5 km,...

By:
Class:
Where:






Blog #3 - Leadership

Why is mentoring important?

Mentorship is an important piece of personal and professional development, and offers students a new perspective or understanding of a topic. A mentor helps the mentee feel supported through new experiences, and can even help enhance such experiences. The feedback that mentors provide to their mentees is valuable not only to help refine technical expertise, but also trains the mentee to receive constructive criticism in a positive light. Further, such a relationship also allows the mentee to observe how the mentor conducts himself or...

By:
Class:
Where:






Blog Post #4 City Cycling Chapters

Bicycling is beginning to be recognized as a legitimate mode of transportation in most western countries. The social, environmental and physical health aspects associated with bicycling as a transportation mode are impossible to ignore. Socially, it is a very affordable mode of transportation – making it extremely equitable. Environmentally it produces almost no noise or air pollution (at least as a part of everyday use – there is obviously embodied energy and pollution in the bicycles and facilities themselves) – in addition the bike facilities and bikes themselves take...

By:
Class:
Where:






Pages