Home

Welcome to Coordinates: CEEatGT's student travel blog!

       

Transit and Bike Integration

Bike and Transit Integration

Planners from all parts of the Netherlands know that transit and bike networks must be integrated if either system is to be truly successful. While most people in the United States see the integration of transit and bikes as a way to solve the “first/last mile problem,” bikes connect Dutch transit users to destinations that may be many miles away.

When using heavy-rail in the Netherlands one can buy a special pass to bring their bikes aboard both heavy and light-rail trains. These bikes have to be held in...

By:
Class:
Where:






Transit and Bikes

The Dutch transit system consists of many elements, including national rail trains, light rail trains (trams), heavy rail trains (metro), and buses. To pay for all of the transit in the Netherlands, the same cards are used for payment (like metro cards for the entire country). The national rail trains connect cities and towns together. Some of the trams also connect small towns to larger cities if the distance is shorter; however, trams tend to be for connections within a city. The metro serves more popular lines within cities and buses fill in the gaps for shorter distances. Bikes are...

By:
Class:
Where:






Bleeding Efficiency: The Dutch Transit Story

Can I bring my bike on it?

For Dutch planners, failing to integrate bikes into other modes of transportation is kind of like going to work without your pants on. It’s bread and butter; the sum of forces equations of planning; the pick and roll of transportation engineering. I can think of a few examples. One is their bike parking at train stations. Gotta catch the train? Cycle to the station and throw your two wheels in a bike parking deck with more spots for cycles than all of Atlanta. It’s safe to say they’re extremely prevalent over here (as in, we saw one on...

By:
Class:
Where:






Blog Post 7: Transit and bike integration

A little bit about Dutch transit..

It is safe to say that the Dutch center much of their world around transit. They have it all; from streetcars and trams to sprinters and trains. Transit is often the first thing to be built with a Dutch settlement, often preceding the bulk of the surrounding development. Once a station is established, several networks are connected to a main hub, an area synonymous with the city center, then those networks spur out in various directions and loops. Upon emergence from a transit station, you will often find a cluster of taller buildings that house...

By:
Class:
Where:






Blog Post #6: Houten

Houten 

A city in which cars are guests on the road! Welcome to Houten! Most of us think that as trains are on tracks, so are cars on roads, but Houten thinks otherwise. In the 1960s, Houten was identified and picked by the national government for development so that it can accommodate the growing population of the Netherlands. Starting from scratch, plans for Houten were drawn on paper and supported by locals. It was time for the village of Houten to become the city of Houten. A big part of the discussion included how to deal with traffic. Considering the...

By:
Class:
Where:






BP 6: Houten

 

Houten

Day 4 in the land of Stroop, where biking is king and nobody drinks water. A group of six of us biked 70 kilometers from Delft to Houten this morning, leaving at o’dark thirty to make it in time for our lectures and tours. It was amazing traveling through the scenic hinterland and we only made a few wrong turns.

                            

   ...

By:
Class:
Where:






Houten

Introduction

Houten is a town that's been designed for the bicycle. With one ring road surrounding the initial development and small connecting roads to residences, this town is an attempt to counter the convenience of cars that exists in most other towns. An extensive cycle network through designated green space connects the train station to residences, offices, and all that Houten has to offer in a short time. Despite having this network, the total bike share of trips is only 40% - lower than neighboring towns that have been retrofitted for the bicycle.

...
By:
Class:
Where:






Pages